little bugger

Last night, I babysat for my friend’s one year old (she just turned one last week!) and I was taken aback at how much she grew, both physically and cognitively. She now could wobbly walk by herself, and pretty quickly too, (considering I got pretty tired following her around for an hour to make sure she didn’t bump her head when she fell over every twenty steps). And she was gabbing, not just baby gabbing, but trying to imitate words that I would say. I swear she was trying to say ssssnake when we were playing with the pet snake, and she even made truck noises as she pushed the duck on wheels. She’s faster, smiles and giggles knowingly and is much taller than before that I felt awkward when i was cradling her to sleep cause her legs poked over. I mean it’s not like she is really thAT big, much smaller than a toddler but so much bigger than the baby i knew at five six even ten months. Also during meal times, she grabbed her spoon so smartly with one hand, kind of like a conductor with his baton, and direct the other to cram the mush beans in her mouth. And oh so hilarious when she would drop food on the table and sweep it off with her spoon, knowing that her mother would want the table to be clean (and who really looks at how dirty the floors are). One last thing that I loved to see, was when she was munching on her cracker  and dropped a few crumbs on the carpet: she saw it, looked at it and then picked it up quite delicately. Is it easier for babies to see small objects because they are just that small? It’s an amazing thing to witness at any rate.  I’m gonna add a picture of this darling (since it’s mostly a handful of people who can see this blog) so you can judge for yourself what a sweet dumpling she is. Image

Ad hoc. Babies are adorable and I have always felt like I could connect with almost any baby or kid. But at the same time, two and half hours is QUITE ENOUGH. I can never imagine myself taking responsibility for one kid 24/7 right now because it takes up so much of your brain and time. It made me realize that even though I think I could handle work and baby in the same moment and could do it, my instincts to be a mom will be so much stronger when the time comes. I think I would be one of those moms who would want to quit work immediately post-baby and never go back again. In some ways it’s good because it means I think i would be a fabulous mom and totally rewarding to do it but I would also lose the chance to get work experience that I have been building for having been a student most of my whole life. I know and admit  family comes before any job or occupation for me. But I also have seen families, mothers and children who suffered because of lack of education and knowledge that they did not seek or didn’t know to seek. In a roundabout way, I hope this masters degree pays off not only in a fulfilling job, but in my job as a mother in the future.

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. jsk says:

    these are the most important lines in this post:

    “and she even made truck noises as she pushed the duck on wheels”

    “Is it easier for babies to see small objects because they are just that small?”

    “she would drop food on the table and sweep it off with her spoon, knowing that her mother would want the table to be clean (and who really looks at how dirty the floors are)”

    “I hope this masters degree pays off not only in a fulfilling job, but in my job as a mother in the future.”

    1. aventuramare says:

      thanks for reading so thoroughly! i really enjoyed writing about this one.

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